What a difference a day makes

24hrs later and there is blue sky, the sun is shining, and the acer is showing off its autumnal colours.

I was determined to finish today and with hard work, short breaks and Denise’s invaluable help, we eventually got there….

The Horn is now intact and fixed into the ground with U shaped hooks, whacked in with a club hammer…….even if this job did require my crawling into a black hole!

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Rain stops play

Arrived early today at Little Yarford Farmhouse in Kingston St Mary, and with my friend Denise’s help, managed to persuade the big end to become part of the overall structure…….several rests and a large bar of chocolate, and the horn of plenty was complete. We then filled in the internal gaps with black ground cover material,  had a quick game of hula hoop, and then attempted to insert the reinforcing rings before torrential rain persuaded us to go home. So far the weather forecast is looking good for tomorrow…..

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Transportation complete

We loaded part one and two of the ‘horn’ (joined),  on to the truck at 8pm on Friday night in the pouring rain. As soon as we had finished securing the load,  the rain stopped… We were all absolutely soaked through and my hair was plastered to my head as though I had been swimming!

We left the house at 7.15 the next morning en route for Kingston St Mary. A convoy of one truck and one car. David, Chris and myself were allocated the lifting whilst Peter’s role was as official photographer (and for a thirteen year old, I think he did a pretty good job).  Luckily it was not raining and although the garden was full of early morning wetness, the sun was shining and the trees and plants looked fantastic.

The first load was the most problematical but the second load was a complete doddle.

Tuesday is installation day and is everybody happy??? I shall be if it doesn’t rain!

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My big end’s gone floppy!

My big end’s gone floppy…..but it happens to us all in the end……

Although the bundles of reeds are quite lightweight they are fractionally too heavy for the frame especially when they’re wet…..and it’s now raining. Panic stations……I contacted Graham Corrick who fabricated the original frame and asked if he could make me some extra rings that I can push inside to reinforce the big end. Hopefully this will fix the problem, but I won’t know until I’m on site….

The method of transport has also proved to be problematic as joining the middle section and the tail-end together proved very stressful (a good thing Zoe wasn’t filming this bit as a lot of editing would have been required!!). Consequently I’ve decided not to separate these two sections again, so my work now needs to be transported as one very big and one medium sized object. Hopefully it’s going to fit on the truck tonight, as Dilly and Brian Bradley are willing to accept delivery at 08.00 tomorrow morning. Husband David, neighbour Chris, and I will do the lifting/carrying (it’s not particularly heavy, just floppy) Wish us luck.

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The reed harvest

I’ve just received some images of the reed harvest at Ham Wall RSPB nature reserve courtesy of James Edwards (reserve assistant) http://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves/guide/h/hamwall/

In the pictures the reeds are been cut with giant machine. I understand that this can only be done where there are large stretches of reeds. The reeds I have been using were all cut by hand and then tied into bundles.

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